TWO MORE EVENTS START AT W.S.O.P. (Update)
2011-06-22

Poker's most prestigious tournament continues to pack 'em in
27 survivors from a starting pack of 3,144 gathered Tuesday for the third and hopefully last day of event 34: $1,000 No-Limit Hold'em, with Michael Souza leading the hunt for the bracelet and the $488,283 that this competition awards the winner. Souza started the day comfortably ahead of nearest rival Rob Verspui as the only other player above the 600 000 chip mark.
Mark Schmid had a 200 000 chip lead on Trevor Vanderveen, Justin Cohen, Robbie Verspui, Benjamin Volpe, Andrew Rudnik and Jonathan Clancy as the last 7 players fought it out Tuesday evening Vegas time, with the first four players all holding over a million chips apiece at the start of level 27.
The second day of event 35: $5,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Six-Handed commenced Tuesday with 105 players surviving an initial first day field of 507, and notable names like Vanessa Selbst (chip leader), Eric Lindgren, Shaun Deeb, Mike "timex" McDonald, and Gregory Brooks still very much in contention, along with David “Devilfish” Ulliott, Joe Hachem, Brian Rast, Layne Flack, Andy Seth, Jeff Lisandro, Jason Mercier, Chance Kornuth, and the always exciting Tom Dwan.
There's a good reward of $548,095 attached to this new event, together with a coveted WSOP bracelet.
By level 18 on Tuesday evening the field was down to 21 players with the top ten chip counts held (in order) by Gregory Brooks (725,000), Erick Lindgren (500,000), Vanessa Selbst (485,000), Joseph Ressler (435,000), Tom Dwan (400,000), Michael McDonald (380,000), Jared Bleznick (340,000) Steven Merrifield (320,000) Jason Mercier (315,000) and Peter Jetten (315 000).
Clearly there is a lot more action in store in this event.
Event 36: $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em launched Tuesday with a field lower than that achieved last year; only 1,734 signed up for the 2011 competition, nevertheless creating a major prize pool of $3.94 million.
The registration list showed an eclectic mix of amateurs, celebrities and professional players that included Ludovic Lacay, Shannon Shorr, Jeff Williams, Scott Montgomery, Jordan Young, Beth Shak, Brad Garrett, Vivek Rajkumar, Lars Bonding, Eric Baldwin, David Pham, Andre Akkari, Alex Gomes, La Sengphet, Erica Schoenberg, Jason Somerville, Dan Fleyshman, Joe Cada, and Jonathan Duhamel.
Playing into Tuesday night the field was down to 490 at level 9, with Chance Kornuth holding a 25 000 chip lead over his closest adversary but many ace players still in the running.
Event 37: $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Championship also kicked off Tuesday with a star-studded entry field of 240 (one player less than signed up for the event last year) generating a prize pool of $2.25 million.
This competition is the final mixed game championship of the 2011 Series, attracting many pros anxious to show off their skills in a range of games as well as earn some money and a bracelet.
Late evening Tuesday Vegas time saw the action reach level 6 with Eugene Katchalov leading on 64,000, with Jimmy Fricke and Andrew Barber biting his heels on 63,000 apiece, and a slew of top players still in a remaining field of 238.




POKER FOR THE TROOPS
2011-04-07

Top aces to head to Football Live Betting Odds nfl football betting Online Sportsbook the war zones
The USO, which provides volunteer celebrity entertainers for shows in war zones where US troops are active, has assembled an all-star poker team to teach the grunts how to play successfully and enjoy the excitement and entertainment of the game.
Posts on Twitter from the organisation advised this week that Howard Lederer, Annie Duke, Tom Dwan, Phil Hellmuth and Huck Seed have all volunteered their services for the USO's inaugural poker tour.
More details will be released soon.


WYNN EXPLAINS CHANGE OF HEART IN POKERSTARS DEAL (Update)
2011-04-07

"I had only misconceptions...." says erstwhile online poker opponent.
Steve Wynn, the owner of Wynn Resorts and a central figure in that company’s recently announced partnership deal with online gambling giant Pokerstars (see previous InfoPowa reports), has expanded on his change of heart from being an opponent of online poker to a supporter of the industry.
Speaking to Nathan Vardi of Forbes Magazine this week, Wynn said that he previously had only misconceptions about online poker.
"I thought it would be difficult to regulate, and if the Internet people got in trouble it would bring the wrath of the government down on us in the live gaming community out here in Las Vegas. I didn't see the business opportunity, I just saw problems, he said."
Then he was approached by the Democratic Party Nevada Senator Harry Reid, Wynn recalls.
"Harry Reid called me and said, 'Steve, there are millions of people playing poker, and it's as American as apple pie. I want my office to look into this and see if we can regulate it.'
"Harry and I have been friends for 40-odd years, we ran marathons together. . . . And I got contacted by the people at PokerStars, who asked, 'Why are you not interested in this? Take a minute and learn the truth about this.'
"That began my exposure to that company and that business and what they do, and I have to tell you I was shocked."
Wynn explained that he had had no idea on a number of aspects of online poker, such as Pokerstars being highly regulated in Europe, employing 1 300 highly skilled people with an average salary is $110,000.
"One of my concerns was about young people playing," said Wynn. "It turns out they have more control about young people playing than we do."
Wynn went on to rationalise the Pokerstars argument regarding the legality of online poker in the United States, namely that the Justice Department opinion is untested in the courts, and that at state level there have been rulings that poker is a game more of skill than of chance.
"I say there is a bit of sophistry here clearly," Wynn told the Forbes writer. "What difference does it make what PokerStars or the Justice Department says? The point is millions of people are playing poker, and they are going to continue to play poker legally or illegally."
Wynn makes the surprising admission that he is not a technophobe, preferring to rely on his staff when it comes to computer and internet issues.
The land gambling mogul gives an interesting insight into his dealings with Pokerstars founder and owner Isai Scheinberg, who explained his motivation for a partnership by saying that Pokerstars had a multitude of American customers, and the company therefore wanted to "do it right".
Scheinberg apparently told Wynn: "I don't want to look over my shoulder at this point of my life."
Wynn responded by emphasising that he would only take his company into a putative online gambling venture if it was legalised at federal level, and if it was a 50-50 deal.
"I know that as a nonbeliever I was convinced by the logic of the argument," Wynn said. "And when I learn something and change my mind I may have the naive notion that other people might be enlightened by the facts themselves."
But he ended on a cautionary note, warning that his conversion "...doesn't mean I am right, especially in Washington."